Beat writers split on result of Syracuse against NC State

first_img Published on October 24, 2018 at 10:39 pm Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse (5-2, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) finds itself in unfamiliar territory as No. 22 North Carolina State (5-1, 2-1) makes the trip to the Carrier Dome this weekend. Syracuse is in striking distance of a bowl game for the first time in five years coming off a 40-37 come-from-behind victory against North Carolina. The Wolfpack, on the other hand, are coming off their first loss of the season, a 41-7 shellacking in Death Valley against Clemson. Saturday’s matchup begins at 7 p.m. on ESPN2.Below, The Daily Orange beat writers make their Saturday predictions.Andrew Graham (6-1)What about the other quarterback?North Carolina State 38, Syracuse 34The Wolfpack comes to the Carrier Dome this Saturday, sorely beaten by Clemson last weekend. The Dome will prove to be no respite, but I think NC State has enough in quarterback Ryan Finley and wideout Kelvin Harmon to leave with a win. Throw in the fact that both of Syracuse’s starting cornerbacks, Chris Fredrick and Scoop Bradshaw, are questionable to go this weekend and the field tilts the Wolfpack’s way. Whether Syracuse starts Tommy DeVito or Eric Dungey, I think North Carolina State will have an answer: Lean on your star quarterback on the road. A Syracuse defense prone to big plays gives up one too many and the bowl watch shifts to Winston-Salem, North Carolina.Matt Liberman (5-2)All bark no biteSyracuse 38, NC State 35AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLooking at this game between Syracuse and NC State one thing sticks out: The Wolfpack offense is very strong. With Ryan Finley under center and three strong wide receivers, headed by an all-conference talent in Kelvin Harmon, I don’t think there’s any doubt the NC State offense can overpower the SU defense. In any other conditions aside from a Saturday night in the Dome, I think this is a win for the Wolfpack. That said, NC State hasn’t beaten anyone particularly strong this season, and in its one challenge thus far, Clemson demolished the Pack down in Death Valley. The Dome will be rocking Saturday night to the tune of thousands. The noise echoing throughout those concrete walls will disrupt the NC State offense, and Syracuse will take advantage, going to its first bowl game since 2013.Josh Schafer (6-1)Back to the Pinstripe BowlSyracuse 45, NC State 37Dungey or DeVito? As long as that question doesn’t distract Syracuse, which the team claims it hasn’t, the Orange can continue riding the wave from its double-overtime victory a week ago. If Syracuse wins a game in the Dino Babers era, it’s always high scoring, and that’s what both teams’ defenses allow for in this matchup. Syracuse ended the North Carolina game on a high note and looked every bit of the team that opened the season 4-0. With a night game atmosphere at home, Syracuse will need to score early to keep the Dome a hostile environment. A weak pass defense from North Carolina State, which ranks in the bottom 30 in the country, allows that, and the Orange prevail in a close game. Commentslast_img read more

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Growing pains in CRISPR gene editing

first_imgJul 12 2018In the six years since its inception, CRISPR gene editing has experienced ups and downs, from giddy excitement over the technology’s potential to cure genetic diseases to patent disputes, ethical considerations and cancer scares. Despite recent setbacks, companies developing CRISPR therapies are forging ahead, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.Related StoriesScientists deploy CRISPR gene-editing tool to engineer multiple editsIDT releases new ultra-high performance CRISPR Cas12a enzymeResearchers develop a more precise version of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing systemThe CRISPR process makes double-stranded breaks at particular sites in DNA, specified by a guide RNA, with an enzyme called Cas9. The cell machinery then repairs the DNA break, while a CRISPR template DNA sequence introduces edits to restore a defective gene’s function. The first clinical trials of CRISPR will take place within the next year. However, since May 2017, a few studies in mice and human cell lines have raised safety concerns over the technology, writes Assistant Editor Ryan Cross.Last month, a pair of papers in Nature Medicine indicated that CRISPR doesn’t work in two human cell lines unless a protein called p53 is broken or missing. Because cancer cells often have defective p53, some media coverage linked CRISPR to cancer. However, representatives from companies developing the technology downplay these results because they are not using these cell lines for their therapies. They also note that an earlier report suggesting that CRISPR is not as precise as intended has been retracted because the alleged off-target effects of the technology were later attributed to natural genetic variation in the studied mice. Source:https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/presspacs/2018/acs-presspac-july-11-2018/crisprs-growing-pains.htmllast_img read more

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