Big chill at new UK plant

first_imgFrozen cookie production at a new UK plant is benefiting from high-volume refrigeration plant supplied by Eurotek (Aylsham, Norwich). The line at Rich Products’ plant in Hartlebury, Worcestershire, includes a new, made-to-measure, Eurotek spiral freezer and refrigeration plant. This can handle a range of product sizes and weights at a maximum speed of around 2,000kg an hour. Rich Products transferred its frozen cookie production from Holland to the UK last year – a move that has enabled it to better serve major clients such as Tesco. Eurotek MD Roger Smith says: “The spiral freezing system offers exceptional flexibility. It can handle large volumes and is well suited to handling product such as cookies, which have been deposited onto sheets of paper.”Constructed entirely from stainless steel, the horizontal airflow spiral freezer is easy to clean and maintain, with a variable speed belt, says Eurotek.last_img read more

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Sainsbury’s reports ‘solid’ start to year

first_imgSainsbury’s has reported a slight 0.8% drop in Q1 like-for-like retail sales (excluding fuel).However, in a statement for the 12 weeks to 4 June 2016, the grocery retailer was able to report a slight rise in total retail sales of 0.3% (excluding fuel).Sainsbury’s hailed the results as a “solid start” to the year, while acknowledging that food price deflation had continued to impact sales and made market conditions “challenging”.In the update, Sainsbury’s also laid out its five-point strategy to deliver a vision of being “the most trusted retailer” which people love to shop at. These points were:Knowing its customers better than anyone elseResponding to customer feedback, the company said it had simplified and lowered its pricing. It had abandoned its Brand Match scheme and, instead, had lowered the price of everyday products. For instance, 250g grated Cheddar cheese had dropped from £2.00 to £1.75. It added that the vast majority of its multi-buy deals will be phased out by August.Great products and services at fair pricesThe company has improved and expanded it allergen-free foods to cover more allergen-specific groups than ever before. The Deliciously FreeFrom range now covers nut, gluten, wheat, milk, eggs and soya allergies with “clear, market-leading” labelling.There for its customersSainsbury’s continues to pursue a multi-channel strategy, claiming growth in both its convenience and online grocery platforms. It also highlighted its new Sainsbury’s groceries online app, which it said gave customers greater flexibility with their online shopping.Colleagues making a differenceThe company praised the customer service delivered by its staff members, claiming its in-store operational metrics for both service and availability had exceeded its targets and improved year-on-year.Its values make it differentHighlighting the importance of its values, Sainsbury’s said its ‘Waste less, Save more’ campaign to tackle household waste was well under way. It said that families in Swadlincote, Derbyshire, were trialling a range of technologies as part of the campaign, including the latest Bosch refrigerator. Fitted with a camera, it allows consumers to see what is in their fridge while shopping to avoid unnecessary waste.”solid start”Speaking about the Q1 figures, Mike Coupe, chief executive at Sainsbury’s, said: “We have made a solid start to the year with like-for-like transaction growth across all our channels and total volume growth. Customers continue to shop with Sainsbury’s, knowing we will deliver on our commitment to provide great quality products and services at fair prices, whenever and wherever they wish to shop.“Sainsbury’s is well-positioned. Our core food business offers customers choice, quality and a clear value proposition. General merchandise and clothing continue to perform well with good sales growth across both businesses, and we continue to see encouraging results from Sainsbury’s Bank, a significant opportunity for long-term growth.“Market conditions remain challenging. Food price deflation continues to impact our sales and pressures on pricing mean the market will remain competitive for the foreseeable future. However, we are confident that our strategy to be a trusted multi-channel, multi-product and -services retailer is delivering and will enable us to continue to outperform our major peers.”In May, Sainsbury’s reported a 14% fall in underlying yearly profits but a £620m rise in pre-tax profits.last_img read more

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One by one, they’re making a difference

first_img Explore Sarah Lockridge-Steckel left Harvard College in 2009 and headed to Memphis, Tenn., where she co-founded The Collective, a nonprofit that works with schools, businesses, and community groups to remove barriers to success for disadvantaged youth.Anne Sung returned home after Commencement in 2000, trading in classes in Harvard Yard to teach in one of Texas’ poorest regions, the Rio Grande Valley on the Mexican border. The lessons from her days with Teach for America resonate today in her role as a trustee of the Houston Independent School District, overseeing the public schools she’d graduated from decades earlier.Fresh from Harvard Law School, Emily Broad Leib went to the rural Mississippi Delta to use her background to improve the lives of residents. Her work there was varied and included one unlikely task early on: Writing a grant for a wood chipper to get rid of fallen tree limbs that were drawing snakes. Now an HLS assistant professor, her experience prompted her to start the Law School’s Mississippi Delta project, which provides public policy and legal help on issues important to the community.The trio are just a sampling of the legions of dedicated, caring, and talented individuals who over the years have brought the skills developed and passions nurtured at Harvard to communities around the country, embracing former Harvard President Charles William Eliot’s admonition, “Depart to Serve Better Thy Country and Thy Kind.” That call to public service, inscribed on Dexter Gate at the edge of the Yard, amounts to a kind of final lesson upon leaving campus.Today the Harvard Gazette is launching a digital project titled “To Serve Better,” featuring dozens of tales of Harvard affiliates like Broad Leib, Sung, and Lockridge-Steckel who returned home — or set up shop in a new home — and worked tirelessly toward the greater good, teaching, inspiring, organizing, legislating, and persevering through setbacks.,The series website contains stories, photos, maps, links, and video chronicling the work of these individuals across the U.S. and its territories. It launches this week with the first wave of 14 from California, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington, and Washington, D.C.The theme for this first batch is “empower,” and the accounts highlight people who work with small groups or grass-roots organizations to strengthen their communities.The project will eventually include sagas from all 50 states, plus additional ones from U.S. territories and the District of Columbia. They will be posted in waves with the themes of “Create,” focusing on inventors, makers, designers, and artists; “Respond,” dedicated to those who heal, fix, and provide service or aid to others; and “Improve,” spotlighting those who seek to fight injustice, solve problems, and advocate for communities at an institutional level.While working on this project, one thing became clear. While the range of their experiences was wide and varied, all of those profiled shared a similar goal. Take Theresa Reno-Weber, a 2008 Harvard Kennedy School graduate, former U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant, and president and CEO of Metro United Way in Louisville, Ky. This is how she explained what drives her to the work she does: “At my core is a desire to leave any place better than I found it, including the organization in which I work or the community in which I live.” To Serve Better Stories of people committed to public purpose and to making a positive difference in communities throughout the country.last_img read more

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Senator Borrello, Assemblyman Goodell Advance Plan To Restart New York

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),I would be interested to know how many people in chautauqua county have been tested?,How many have this virus that doesn’t even know they have it? It’s so scary out there ALBANY – With the COVID-19 crisis spiking unemployment in the state, shuttering thousands of  businesses and driving up government budget deficits, Senator George Borrello and Assemblyman Andy Goodell advanced a plan for a phased-in reopening of New York’s economy.The strategy hinges on application of a regionally based assessment model that would determine risk level based on a variety of factors including population density, infection rate and health care capacity. The strategy would also incorporate risk analysis by industry.The geographical template for the plan would be the state’s existing ten Regional Economic Development Council zones (REDC).Each zone would be evaluated based on a multi-tiered risk assessment that could include factors such as infection level, hospitalization utilization, demographic and trend data, such as the increase or decrease in number of active cases. Risk analysis by business sector would also be conducted, based on the four-level model developed by OSHA, with corresponding guidelines for protecting workers safety.“Almost like a horror film, the COVID-19 pandemic invaded our world seemingly overnight, and in so doing, changed life as we know it. While our battle with this insidious virus isn’t over, the strength and unity of New Yorkers in meeting this challenge has been extraordinary, helping us ‘flatten the curve’ and ease infection rates in many of our hardest hit downstate areas,” said Senator George Borrello.“However, an economic crisis has been unfolding alongside our public health emergency. The shuttering of our businesses has resulted in staggering job losses – 1.2 million residents filed for unemployment over the past five weeks, four times the total number of jobs lost during the Great Recession of 2008.”“While New York is one state, we cannot ignore the reality that there is a huge gap between infection rates in New York City and its surrounding counties and rural areas of upstate. For example, in Chautauqua County we currently have four active cases and a substantial drop in the number of people in precautionary quarantine. That is just one example, but it is illustrative of the experience of many rural areas,” said Borrello. “Under the plan we are advancing, economies in regions like this could be safely restarted by following safety protocols, putting people back to work and saving many small businesses from having to close their doors forever.”“Each day that passes puts us in further economic jeopardy. While the governor’s statewide edicts have been done out of an abundance of caution, we cannot restart our economy with the same ‘one-size-fits-all’ process,” said Assemblyman Andy Goodell. “The impact of this pandemic on the various regions of our state has been vastly different and a common-sense plan needs to be tailored to fit the level of risk.”Senator Borrello and Assemblyman Goodell have submitted their plan to New York State Commissioner of Tax and Finance, Michael Schmidt, who will be part of the Cuomo administration’s team working on restarting the economy.last_img read more

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Extension Awards

first_imgUniversity of Georgia and Fort Valley State University Cooperative Extension agents gathered in Athens, Georgia, last week to recognize the work of their colleagues’ achievements at the annual Georgia meeting of Epsilon Sigma Phi (ESP), a professional organization for those working in Extension. In addition to awards recognizing accomplishments in educational programming, the meeting allows agents to learn from each other. Poster presentations featuring successful programs from across the state are an annual part of the group’s meeting. UGA Extension has 300 Extension agents serving in 157 counties across Georgia. Their mission is to spread research-based knowledge from the campus of the university to every small town, farm field and city block in Georgia.  “My message to all of you here today is really a simple one,” UGA President Jere Morehead told the agents gathered on Friday, Sept. 4. “Please just keep doing what you’re doing to showcase this wonderful university. Please continue with the pride for the work that you do that then causes the people you interact with to have admiration for this university. And please keep doing, every day, the little things that add up to the great things that this university means to the state of Georgia.” This year, Epsilon Sigma Phi recognized agents from across the state who answered Morehead’s call to find ways to make the knowledge and research of the university impact the lives of Georgians more directly. Award winners include: ESP Friend of Extension, Georgia Chapter Award: Rep. Terry England (Auburn, Georgia)Distinguished Service Award: Stephens County Extension Coordinator Forrest Connelly Continued Excellence Recognition: Spalding County 4-H Agent Cherry HovatterMid-Career Service Recognition: Muscogee County Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agent Rhea BentleyEarly Career Service Recognition: Tattnall County Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) Agent Chris TysonDiversity Multicultural Recognition for a Team: Dougherty County Extension Coordinator James Morgan, Dougherty County FCS Agent Suzanne Williams and Crisp County 4-H Agent Randy West Diversity Multicultural Recognition for an Individual: Muscogee County FCS Agent Rhea BentleyDistrict New Professional Awards: Northeast District, Walton County 4-H Agent Jenna Daniel; Northwest District, Fulton County ANR Agent Rolando Orellana; Southeast District, Bacon County ANR Agent Will Lovett; Southwest District, Berrien County ANR Agent Eddie BeasleyTal DuVall Scholarship: Tattnall County ANR Agent Chris TysonESP Professional Development Fellowships: Seminole County 4-H Agent Cindy Meadows and Mitchell County 4-H Agent Jennifer GroganAdministrative Leadership Recognition: Mitchell County 4-H Agent Jennifer GroganMeritorious Support Service Award: Northeast District, Franklin County 4-H Program Assistant Audrey Justice; Northwest District, Coweta County Extension Secretary Pamela Burkey; Southeast District, Bacon County Extension Secretary Sharon Bridges; Southwest District, Randolph County Extension Secretary Drusilla WhatleyFor more information about Epsilon Sigma Phi, please visit esp.caes.uga.edu. For more information about about UGA Extension, please visit extension.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Do the R-2: Tiny rafts, steep creeks, big fun

first_imgLinc Stallings running Class IV+ dueling waterfalls. See the full gallery. Photo: Jeremy Rogers“I’ve got a 50/50 success rate with that drop. About half the time, I swim,” Linc Stallings tells me after he negotiates our boat over a 10-foot waterfall into a deep pool flanked by massive boulders. We’re running the North Fork of the French Broad, a small stream that drops off the Blue Ridge Parkway in Western North Carolina. It’s a rain-dependent creek with class IV+ vertical drops, deep pools, and technical boulder gardens scattered throughout a two-mile stretch that’s popular with creek boaters. We’re running it in a small two-person raft called an R-2. Across the Southern Appalachians, a handful of boaters are beginning to take these small, 10-foot rafts down narrow, class IV-V creeks that have previously only been run in kayaks and the occasional canoe. It’s a niche sport that even some creek boaters think is a little crazy.“People freak out when they see rubber coming down a creek,” Stallings says. “There are only a few people who would take a raft down these narrow rivers, so people still think it’s wild.”Of those few R-2 boaters, Linc Stallings is easily one of the most experienced. The 36 year old has been guiding rafts down class V rivers for 15 years, working the biggest rivers in the South and Colorado depending on the year. He’s a rare breed: a professional raft guide, someone who’s committed to this as a career, not just something to do between college and “the real world.”“I always thought I’d do it and move on. But I just kept doing it,” Stallings says. “I love it. I love taking people out on the river. I love hanging out with other boaters. I love the water.”R-2 creeking is essentially what raft guides do on their day off. They borrow a small two-person raft from their bosses and push it, scrape it, and paddle like hell through tight rain-dependent creeks in the mountains. The North Fork of the French Broad is one of Stallings’ favorites. He first learned to creek boat here while attending Brevard College’s wilderness immersion program. He knows the nuances of every significant rapid the way a tween girl knows the lyrics to a Justin Bieber song.“A ton of people have run this creek in a kayak,” he tells me as we begin to paddle toward the first class III rapid, just 50 yards from the put-in. “But running it in a raft has a completely different dynamic. Running tight drops in this big boat is fun, but there are some logistical things you have to work out. It’s like doing a math problem.” 1 2last_img read more

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RPPTL Section honors Diamond

first_imgRPPTL Section honors Diamond Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section members were told last session not to expect anything from the Florida Legislature, because the focus would be on redistricting and the budget.But largely thanks to the tireless efforts of RPPTL Legislative Chair Sandra Diamond, the section got all of its legislation passed and signed by the governor.In recognition of her efforts, and the efforts of her law firm, Williamson Diamond & Caton of Seminole, the RPPTL Section presented Diamond with the Annual Service Award at the Legislative Update and Executive Council Meeting in Boca Raton on July 26.“Selecting the recipient of the section’s Annual Service Award is usually a very difficult thing to do. We are fortunate to have a large number of people doing very important work for the section and the Bar, all of whom are deserving of the award,” said past RPPTL Chair J. Michael Swaine.“However, for the year 2001-02, one person rose head and shoulders above the rest.. . . There are a number of people who deserve special thanks for that effort, but foremost is the recipient of our Annual Service Award, our Legislative Chair Sandy Diamond. Sandy worked tirelessly for the section. Some people say that she actually spent more time in Tallahassee than some of the legislators. We all thank her, and it is my pleasure to present this well-deserved award to her.” RPPTL Section honors Diamondcenter_img September 15, 2002 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Longtime credit union employee pleads guilty to embezzlement

first_imgA 62-year-old Missouri woman, who worked for nearly three decades at the $30.1 million Shelter Insurance Federal Credit Union, pleaded guilty Thursday to embezzling more than $230,000 in U.S. District Court.Debra L. Wenger of Columbia, Mo., worked as a teller and administrative assistant, and assumed all of the accounting responsibilities at the credit union, according to Missouri federal prosecutors.In February 2016, an external auditor detected the misappropriation of funds after finding a discrepancy when comparing the general ledger teller cash to the cash-balancing sheet.When Wenger was questioned by Columbia Police Department investigators, she admitted to taking the cash from her teller drawer and depositing the funds into her personal account, according to federal prosecutors. continue reading » 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Millennial Generation: Overhyped or just right?

first_img continue reading » Millennials. Millennials, Millennials, Millennials. Oh, did I forget to mention, Millennials?There they are, seemingly in every news story expose about politics, economics, social media, you name it. If there’s anything the Millennial Generation gets right, it’s self-aggrandizement via social media recognition.Do they have money? Yes.Are they a rising financial power that banks and credit unions are wise to address? Yes.Are they the sole generation that with the click of yet another selfie will save the future of financial institutions as we know them? Tap the brakes on that.Sandwiched between the Baby Boomer Generation and the much mentioned Millennials are people like me — Gen Xers. Remember us? 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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GoPro’s CEO Dropped by $229 Million to Fulfill a Promise to…

first_imgGoPro founder and CEO Nick Woodman has honored a promise he made to his college roommate a decade ago and it cost him $229 million. Woodman had promised to give his college roommate Neil Dana 10 percent of all the money he makes when taking his company public. In 2011, GoPro issued Dana 6.3 million stock options. Woodman agreed to reimburse the company whenever the options were exercised.Neil Dana, who attended the University of California at San Diego with Woodman, was GoPro’s first employee. He currently serves as the company’s director of music and specialty sales.Woodman, whose net worth will fall to $2.3 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, was awarded $285.3 million in 2014 compensation, making him the highest-paid U.S. executive.GoPro CEO Nick Woodman.last_img read more

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