NY to lift Covid capacity restrictions May 19

first_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Cuomo also announced today that the city’s subway system will resume 24-hour service May 17 for the first time in a year. (Getty)Last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio vowed that New York City would fully reopen by July 1, just in time for weary city residents to have a “summer of fun.” It wasn’t his call to make, but — perhaps by design — it appears that day will come much sooner.His longtime nemesis Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced today that most capacity restrictions will be lifted throughout New York state, as well as in Connecticut and New Jersey, by May 19. Most businesses — including restaurants and bars, gyms, barber shops and retailers — will be able to operate at full capacity, provided they can ensure that patrons are maintaining social distancing. The same will go for houses of worship.Indoor and outdoor venues, meanwhile, can increase the number of people allowed in — to 30 and 33 percent capacity, respectively — assuming all patrons can provide proof of vaccination. Outdoor social gatherings will now have a maximum capacity of 500 people and indoor ones will increase to 250.ADVERTISEMENTThe same rules will be in effect for New Jersey. In Connecticut, capacity restrictions had already largely been lifted as of May 1, but any remaining ones will be gone by the 19th.Last week, as Covid-19 cases declined and vaccinations increased, de Blasio said, “We are ready to bring New York City back fully on July 1, all systems go, because you’ve earned it. This is going to be the summer of New York City.”But, as usual, the governor had more to say.“I don’t want to wait that long,” said Cuomo, who has been eager to show he can govern while his sexual harassment and nursing home scandals play out.Business owners have been pressuring Cuomo for months to ease capacity restrictions throughout the city, with several lawsuits filed recently in an effort to get restaurants back at full capacity. Just last week, the governor announced that restaurants would be allowed to operate at 75 percent.Cuomo also announced today that the city’s subway system will resume 24-hour service May 17. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has not run subways 24/7 since last May, when overnight service was disrupted in order to facilitate cleaning of the system and, unofficially, to remove homeless people. Ridership has been steadily rising in the past few months after plummeting at the start of the pandemic.“Overnight workers like waitresses, bartenders and more depend on transit to get around in the late-night hours,” Sarah Feinberg, the interim president of New York City Transit, said in a statement. “We’ve been moving them for the last year by bus and I’m thrilled that we can once again provide them with safe and efficient overnight subway service as well, as more Covid restrictions on businesses are lifted.”Contact Amy Plitt Email Address* Full Name* Andrew CuomoCommercial Real EstateCoronavirusPoliticscenter_img Share via Shortlink Message* Tagslast_img read more

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Venture capital group that backed Zoopla sells its last ZPG shares

first_imgHome » News » Venture capital group that backed Zoopla sells its last ZPG shares previous nextProducts & ServicesVenture capital group that backed Zoopla sells its last ZPG sharesOctopus Investments cashes in final shares in the group.Nigel Lewis16th February 201701,286 Views Octopus Investments, the venture capital firm that backed the start-up of Zoopla in 2009, has sold its last stake in what is now ZPG plc, it has been revealed.Its Octopus Titan VCT, which claims to be the largest venture capital trust in the UK, invested in Zoopla via its Zenith investment vehicle from 2013 onwards in preparation for a flotation on the London Stock Exchange. This took place in June 2014, valuing ZPG at £919 million.Since then Octopus Titan has been slowly selling its remaining interests in ZPG as the portal’s share price has peaked and troughed, particularly over the past 18 months. During this period the ZPG share price has risen from £2.10p to £3.83p a share, an increase of 82%.Octopus Investments said that it has now realised its last remaining investment in ZPG after a more recent surge in ZPG’s share price following the announcement that it has bought Hometrack for £120 million.“The board is delighted that it has been part of Zoopla’s success story and that shareholders have benefitted investment in the first billion dollar business to have been backed by a venture capital trust,” says a statement from Octopus Titan.The biggest major holder of shares in Zoopla now is DMG Media, the digital arm of DMGT, owner of the Daily Mail, which merged its portals PrimeLocation and Findaproperty into the ZPG in return for a 31% holding in the group, now worth over half a billion.Alex Chesterman’s personal stake in the company is currently worth approximately £49 million while two agent groups still hold substantial shares in ZPG – Connells and Countrywide.Octopus Investments Zoopla February 16, 2017Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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COA: Officers Don’t Have To Relay Specifics Of Their ‘Reasonable Suspicions’

first_imgCOA: Officers Don’t Have To Relay Specifics Of Their ‘Reasonable Suspicions’IL for www.theindianalawyer.comDeciding that police officers do not have to relay the specific details of their reasons for being suspicious of a person before an officer stops and detains that person, the Indiana Court of Appeals has rejected a man’s argument that evidence of his possession of a handgun was improperly admitted.In the case of Charles Dunson v. State of Indiana, 49A04-1603-CR-469, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officers responded to a call about gunshots, shouting and violence in the 2400 block of Kenwood Avenue. The officers arrived and found Tamika Coleman bleeding from the face. During the officers’ conversation with Coleman, Charles Dunson drove past on a motorcycle and Coleman told officers he was involved in the altercation.Officer Cathy Faulk indicated through police radio broadcast to Officer Matthew Addington and others that a man on a silver motorcycle “may be involved” in the situation, and Addington, upon seeing Dunson on his motorcycle, detained him. He then noticed a bulge in Dunson’s pants, patted him down and seized a handgun.Dunson was charged with Class A misdemeanor carrying a handgun without a license, but the charge was enhanced to a Level 5 felony because Dunson had previously been convicted on the same offense. During his trial, Dunson challenged the admissibility of the seized handgun as evidence, but the Marion Superior Court overruled his objects and convicted him on the felony charge.In his appeal, Dunson said Addington’s detainment and seizure of his gun violated his Fourth Amendment rights because the officer “lacked reasonable suspicion to believe (he) was engaged in criminal activity prior to stopping him and any knowledge known to the investigating officer cannot be imputed on the stopping officer,” as is required under Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1, 88, S. Ct. 1868 (1968).Specifically, Dunson said Faulk’s indication officers on a radio broadcast that he may have been involved in the altercation was not specific enough to create reasonable suspicion.But the Indiana Court of Appeals disagreed, writing in a Friday opinion that the Indiana Supreme Court had previously held in Griffith v. State,788 N.E. 2d 835, 840 (Ind. 2003) that, “Where there is a police-channel communication to the arresting officer, he acts in good faith thereon, and such knowledge and information exist within the department, the arrest is based on probable cause.”Such a police-channel communication existed between Faulk and Addington, the appellate court said, so Addington’s detention of Dunson was based upon collective law enforcement information. Although Faulk did not relay the exact details of her suspicion of Dunson, requiring her to do so would be cumbersome, practical and potentially dangerous, the court wrote.“Requiring the level of detail Dunson suggests is necessary could hamstring an officer’s ability to effectively carry out his or her duties,” Judge Michael Barnes wrote for the court. “Allowing officers to rely on the collective knowledge of the law enforcement organization is practical and leads to more efficient police work.”FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Two O.C. Wawa Employees Test Positive for COVID-19

first_imgSigns alert Wawa patrons at the 34th Street location that the store is temporarily closed. (Photo credit Facebook forum OCNJ Chatter) By MADDY VITALEMemos hung in the windows at the front of the Wawa at 110 34th Street in Ocean City direct customers to turn around and head to an alternate Wawa after two employees tested positive for COVID-19, forcing a temporary shutdown of the convenience store.In one of several memos dated Monday, April 20, Wawa officials explained that two employees who had worked at the location informed management that they had tested positive for the coronavirus.“In accordance with our stringent protocols we took immediate action,” the memo reads.Later in the memo, it states, “As always, the health and safety of our customers and associates is our top priority.”Another message advises patrons to visit the other Wawa in Ocean City at 1250 West Ave. or the Wawa in Marmora since it is unclear when the store on 34th Street will reopen. “Dear customers, we have temporarily closed this store and hope to reopen it soon,” it reads.No one from Wawa’s corporate headquarters could be reached for comment Wednesday prior to publication time. However, patrons who have concerns are asked in one of the memos to contact their local health department. People may also call Wawa’s customer service number at 800-444-9292 for questions.last_img read more

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SSP sees UK LFLs growth

first_imgSSP, the leading food operator in travel locations worldwide, saw like-for-like sales (LFLs) grow by 3.7% in the UK in its first half.Announcing its interim results for the six months to 31 March 2014 it said that its UK revenue has decreased slightly by 0.3% on a constant currency basis.The company, which runs brands like Upper Crust and Delice de France, said the LFL growth had been driven by continued growth in UK airport passenger numbers and increased spend per passenger. The net contract losses were primarily a consequence of the previously reported loss of a rail on-board catering contract part way through 2014.Underlying operating profit for the UK increased by 37.4% to £18m, while underlying operating margin increased by 1.5% to 5.3%.Globally revenue was up 2.6% on a constant currency basis to £859.2m and operating profit was £25.2m. Kate Swann, chief executive of SSP Group, said: “Our confidence in the future is supported by our increasing investment in the business and by the further strengthening of the portfolio of brands and concepts we offer to our clients. The second half of the financial year has started in line with our expectations, and whilst a degree of uncertainty always exists around passenger numbers in the short-term, we continue to be well positioned to benefit from the underlying positive trends in our markets.”last_img read more

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Phish Delivers Boston Cream Mash-Up, “Ghost,” & “The Lizards” For Penultimate Baker’s Dozen Performance

first_imgLoad remaining images Night twelve. It feels like just yesterday that this thirteen night run was on the horizon, as fans eagerly speculated about what Phish would do for this historic residency at New York’s Madison Square Garden. As the Baker’s Dozen progressed, each show became its own special donut, flavored with one-off covers, big jams, and, incredibly, no repeated songs. Each and every show has been relished among the adoring crowd, hailed as some of the band’s finest of their 34 year career.Now, we’ve arrived at the penultimate performance, and lots of heavy hitting song choices loomed over the final two proceedings. Not only that, but Saturday night’s performance was “Boston Cream” night; a show that fans have been eagerly awaiting since Page McConnell mentioned it in a 2007 Relix interview. Surely the cover of Boston’s “Foreplay/Long Time” would make its return. The band would obviously cover Cream. Lock it in.While most shows have started with a theme-appropriate cover selection, Phish wasted no time diving into their repertoire with a rousing rendition of Bob Marley‘s “Soul Shakedown Party.” The smooth reggae tones got the crowd loose and the band looser. The celebratory opening number gave way to a cover of the bluegrass classic, Bill Monroe’s “Uncle Pen,” with Trey Anastasio ripping through the song’s complex leads. The band went to Gamehendge for the next number, bringing out a rocking version of “The Sloth” to keep the party grooving.“Gotta Jibboo” saw Phish really get into their first jam of the night, as the whole band settled in for this first set fourteen minute groove fest. Once Page worked his magic on the grand piano, the jam shifted into high gear, and Trey raised the jam into a triumphant peak. After a brief discussion on stage, Mike Gordon took vocals on the band’s bizarre rocker, “Fuck Your Face.” The once long-forgotten number has had a revitalization in the 3.0 era, coming out of the woodworks to whip the crowd into a frenzy.With the energy at full throttle, the band started out innocently enough with a cover of Cream’s “Sunshine Of Your Love.” Things quickly took a turn, however, as the end of the first chorus transitioned into Boston’s “More Than A Feeling.” It’s a Boston Cream medley! After running through some of the classic Boston tune, the band momentarily dove into what sounded like Cream’s “Tales Of Brave Ulysses,” before dropping into a jam on “Sunshine Of Your Love” once more. That quickly broke into “Long Time,” the second half of the famed “Foreplay/Long Time” that had been predicted – and that hadn’t been played since 1999. The chorus here was particularly interesting, as different band members sang choruses of “Long Time,” “Sunshine Of Your Love” and another Cream classic, “White Room.” The band finished up the medley with a return to the main riff of “Sunshine,” putting a cap on their “Sunshine Of Your Feeling” mash-up.After they finished, Trey joked that “Kansas Metallica” was going to be the final donut flavor. They promptly explained that the joke was “20 years in the making,” and that they basically planned the whole run for this “Boston Cream” extravaganza. It was truly a fun moment in the band’s residency, adding an extra layer to the one-off covers that have been a cornerstone of the Baker’s Dozen. Side bar: Umphrey’s McGee fans must have felt right at home for this.The set continued with its first cool-down moment, bringing back the Trey song “Frost” for only the second time ever, and the first since 7/17/13 (168 shows). My personal theory is that the song was a reference to the donuts themselves: the Boston Cream was actually the frost-ing instead of the filling. Likely a practical donut-making decision (read the NPR donut scoop for more), the mellow “Frost” was a fun reprieve for more high-energy songs to come.“Scent Of A Mule” immediately followed, with some excellent solos from Page (including a “Sunshine Of Your Love” tease) and Gordo before the song’s exciting finale. The third Jimi Hendrix cover came next, as the band rocked MSG with some pure “Fire.” Trey was wailing in true Jimi style, keeping the excitement high. “Alaska” followed, as Jon Fishman kept the pace for a bluesy funk jam that had everyone dancing. “Plasma” closed out the set, with Trey taking the lead throughout an energetic jam that peaked in fine fashion. The guitarist’s final notes again teased “Sunshine Of Your Love,” adding one last dose of Cream to the performance.With the “no repeat” rule in effect for the Baker’s Dozen, there were a handful of unplayed songs that came highly anticipated for the last two nights. Set two opened with one of these classics, as the blues-heavy riff of “Ghost” rang out through The Garden. Here we go. The whopping 21-minute take saw the band immediately lock into some thick funk, patiently building the energy through a pentatonic fueled groove. As the jam continued to gain momentum, the band subtly switched into a major key, allowing for some prime melodic improvisation from Trey and Page. Trey led the jam through countless emotional peak moments, continually upping the ante for a truly climactic conclusion. This was easily the jam of the night, as one might expect from a “Ghost” on the Twelfth Night.The jam ended in some deep dark tones, before breaking into the first “Petrichor” since the song’s dramatic interpretation on New Year’s 2016. Though this version didn’t have choreography, horns, or falling silicone raindrops, the band adeptly wove their way through the ornate composition. Trey gave the song a little extra mustard near its conclusion, bringing things up before dropping into another 3.0 favorite, “Light.” This version went down and dirty with Page leading the charge on the organ.As the “Light” jam ended, Trey strummed the opening chord of another Gamehendge classic, “The Lizards.” Another song highly anticipated for the last two nights, the band drew vigorous applause as they worked their way through the beautiful composition. They extended out the song a bit longer than usual, as is the new normal of the Baker’s Dozen, delighting fans with an all-time favorite tune.After treating fans to four songs in the first hour of set two, the band wrapped things up with a handful of shorter selections, including “The Horse/Silent In The Morning,” Bob Dylan’s “Quinn The Eskimo,” and “Rocky Top.” It’s tempting to pine for fewer total songs in the second frame, but each of these songs are quintessential in the Phish catalog, and did a great job keeping the energy high at MSG.The band returned for one more song, playing the ballad “Joy” as their encore. The message was loud and clear: “We want you to be happy.” Though this was one of the slowest encores of the run, the significance of the moment certainly left fans with smiles on their faces. If “Boston Cream” was the center of their Baker’s Dozen inspiration, then encouraging their fans’ happiness was an all-too-fitting finale for this penultimate donut theme.Of course, the message of “We want you to be happy” has been at the forefront of this run. Phish’s dedication to the craft of live music is second to none, and the Baker’s Dozen is the ultimate example. As a native New Yorker, I’ve been blessed with the opportunity to see more Phish in the last two weeks than I ever could have imagined. They’ve approached this run with such passion, challenging themselves to surpass our wildest expectations, every single night. It has been, in a word, incredible.Thank you L4LM team, for giving me this (last minute) opportunity to, once again, share my love of Phish with your readers. Thank you Chris Kuroda, for consistently blowing my mind. Thank you to every single person I’ve met at MSG, for sharing in the groove. And of course, thank you Phish, for these legendary performances. Can’t wait to see what you have in store for the Baker’s Dozen finale.Hot Takes: Repeat Watch: At this point, I have “More Than A Feeling” that night 13 won’t have any repeats. We’ve come this far, right?Today’s Donut: “Boston Cream” [“Sunshine Of Your Feeling,” the mash-up of Boston and Cream that we never knew we needed, with bits of “More Than A Feeling” (Boston), “Long Time” (Boston), “Sunshine Of Your Love” (Cream), and “White Room” (Cream). Am I the only one who heard “Tales Of Brave Ulysses” in there too? This page from the Zonkey playbook could not have been more fun.]We Tired Yet?: We’ve been to 12 Phish shows in the last 16 days. What do you think?SETLIST: Phish | Baker’s Dozen Night 12 | Madison Square Garden | New York, NY | 8/5/17SET 1: Soul Shakedown Party, Uncle Pen, The Sloth, Gotta Jibboo, Fuck Your Face, Sunshine of Your Love[1] -> More Than a Feeling[2] > Sunshine of Your Love > Foreplay/Long Time[3], Frost, Scent of a Mule, Fire, Alaska, PlasmaSET 2: Ghost, Petrichor, Light > The Lizards, The Horse > Silent in the Morning > Quinn the Eskimo > Rocky TopENCORE: Joy[1] Phish debut.[2] Phish debut; incomplete.[3] Incomplete.Tonight’s Donut: Glazed, pink glaze with rainbow sprinkles.[Photos by Andrew Blackstein]Phish | Baker’s Dozen Night 12 | 8/5/17 | Photos by Andrew Blacksteinlast_img read more

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Beanstalk Music Festival Announces 2019 Lineup: Magic Beans, TAUK, Aqueous

first_imgColorado’s own Magic Beans have announced the lineup for their seventh-annual Beanstalk Music & Mountains Festival at Bond, Colorado’s Rancho Del Rio, set to take place on June 27th–29th, 2019.Magic Beans will play three shows throughout the weekend’s festivities, along with headlining performances from fellow jam band favorites TAUK and Aqueous.Com Truise will perform a sunset set, along with Ghost-Note and Adam Deitch & The Midnight Marauders, featuring Lettuce bandmate Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff, The Motet’s Joey Porter, Garrett Sayers, and trumpeter Gabriel Mervine.Beanstalk staples lespecial and Yak Attack will both perform late-night sets, after having both made huge moves in the last year. Last year, the Oregon-based live electronic trio treated fans to a late-night pop-up set on Saturday night following Magic Beans’ grand finale festival-closing set, so expect something extra-special from the Jedi musicians. Yak Attack drummer Nick Werth is the younger brother of Ghost-Note leader Nate Werth, presenting a nice opportunity for the brothers to potentially share some stage time.Cycles (x2), Exmag, The Sweet Lillies, Meadow Mountain, Part & Parcel, Formula 5, Dizgo, Goose, and Kessel Run round out the lineup, in addition to daytime DJ sets on the river by Galaxe, Tri-Tip, and Sundae Service.For more information on Beanstalk 2019, ticketing, and the upcoming full-lineup announcement, head to the festival’s website here.last_img read more

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Professor teaches last course at ND

first_imgMarketing professor John Weber, nicknamed “Weebs,” said he lives by three rules — have fun, be nice to everyone and think about turtles once in a while. Weber taught his last class at Notre Dame Wednesday after 42 years as a member of the faculty, but said the “Turtle Club,” created by his seven grandchildren, will continue to grow. Weber invites his students and friends to join the club, even giving them laminated membership cards and a club certificate that lists the three rules, Weber said. “The silly stuff like that is reflective of my years here because I like to have a lot of fun and I like to be close to students,” Weber said. “That is the hallmark of my time here.” Weber built long-lasting friendships with many Notre Dame undergraduates during his time as a professor, a Hall Fellow in Morrissey Hall and the moderator of the Marketing Club. “I have always been very social,” Weber said. “From the start, the most enjoyable part of teaching for me has been interfacing with the students.” Weber began teaching at the University in 1969. He arrived at Notre Dame at the same time as Mendoza’s first copy machine. “There were only 40 faculty members in the College of Business at that time,” Weber said. Notre Dame began to expand and build a reputation as a research university, and Mendoza currently employs almost 200 faculty members, Weber said. “The research expectations in the College of Business have just gone through the roof. I feel very concerned about the younger faculty because it is very difficult to achieve tenure now,” Weber said. “That relates back to interfacing with students. It is difficult for young faculty today to set aside time for undergraduate students.” Weber saw positive changes in the University as well. “Admitting women allowed us to keep up the quality of our students and round out the male part of our student body from a maturity view,” Weber said. “Having women as an integral part of all dimensions of campus life better prepares all our students for the real world, a world where women are increasingly playing leadership roles.” Weber said leadership in the College of Business led the University to its current ranking as the No. 1 school for undergraduate business in the nation. “While some colleges still have relatively high student to faculty ratios, we have added more faculty,” Weber said. “We are willing to bring in the big guns to help improve our standing among national and international universities.” Campus facilities and technology also allowed students to learn more, Weber said. Senior Tom Smith signed up for Weber’s Business to Business marketing course because of recommendations from friends. “I heard he was a great professor even though this was an 8 a.m. course. I honestly never thought I would make it to every 8 a.m. class, but I can successfully say I did it,” Smith said. “And I stayed awake every day.” Smith said Weber constantly reached out to his class and even hosted a cookout for them in his home. “He visibly cares about his students,” Smith said. “Of all the teachers I have had here, he has done the most to connect to his students.” In 2001, Weber was made an honorary member of the Class of 1981 and remains close with students from that class. Dan Tarullo, a 1981 graduate, lived in Morrissey Hall while Weber was a Hall Fellow and is one of almost 30 alumni who participate in the “Weeb’s Open,” an annual golf tournament and informal reunion in late July. Over 15 members of this group hosted a surprise dinner for Weber Tuesday evening and visited his class Wednesday morning. “This group here has been together over 30 years and we come back together every year because of this man,” Tarullo said. The group shared stories about Thursday night bowling, cookouts and golf scrambles with Weber’s current students. They recounted tales of Weber when he stole bowling shoes and jumped into a pond at a local golf course in a victory celebration. Weber said the long-standing friendships he formed with students are the most valuable product of his time at Notre Dame. “It all starts with one-on-one personal relationships with students. The first rule of the Turtle Club is to have fun,” Weber said. “You have to have fun.”last_img read more

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Rebranding: Embarking on an Amazon journey

first_imgWhen a rebrand comes out of left field, your executive team, your board, even your frontline staff, may be thinking, “at least take me out to dinner first.” A rebrand won’t fix a high-friction organization, so why start the process off that way? It takes self-awareness and self-control to lead a rebrand. How can you sway your team to be excited and optimistic about a rebrand?We can trick ourselves into believing a rebrand will solve our problems and fix mistakes. The truth is your growth and scale will now be challenged by a reactive decision. How consumers feel or describe your credit union or community bank – the words you want them to use to describe you – won’t change, or at least, they won’t change for very long.Sure, every rebrand comes with a honeymoon phase. For a while, you’ll think you’ve unlocked greatness within your organization. But without shared values and beliefs within your organization, you’ll quickly discover that you lack a competitive advantage. Before you know it, your brand will go the way of the fidget spinner. continue reading » 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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