Through the Grapevine

first_imgWhy does wine tasting matter? Maybe you want to make an impression on a first date. Maybe you need to choose the wine for a birthday party. Whatever the reason, skilled tasting makes you appreciate wines and their individuality: you can work out what it is you like in a drinnk and what you don’t. Experimenting with wine is fun, especially with friends. Unlike certain members of the class, we don’t profess to be connoisseurs (or perhaps that’s just Beth being bitter because she couldn’t tell the difference between a £3 and a £30 wine) but here are a few skeletal tips to get you going.Although expensive wine does not necessarily equal good wine, spending a few extra pounds can make a world of a difference. Roughly £1.90 of how much you spend on a wine will go towards duty; a decent cork will cost upwards from £1; pasting a brand label on a bottle will add another £1. If you’re spending under £5 on a bottle, think how much it cost to actually produce the wine you’re about to drink: it doesn’t take a genius to realise it’s unlikely to taste phenomenal.Some wines are delicious on their own but others taste wholly different when used to complement food. The easiest way to choose the best wine for meal is to take recipes and wines from the same region, where they will have developed in tandem. Red wines are often served far too warm, and whites too cold. The colder the wine, the less aromatic and flavoursome it is. On the other hand, you might get away with pouring an abominable wine for unsuspecting friends if you serve it cold enough. If you like the way a wine tastes now, drink it now: a wine can taste completely different with age. A bad wine will always age badly. Screw caps are nothing to be ashamed of: for young, floral whites, they’re the best way of trapping in their light flavours.Having been enlightened by the classes, we have decided to turn over a new leaf. No more Oddbins’ special in plastic cups, no more bargain bin deals. Cheese and fine wine soirées are the future. by Cathy Thomas and Beth WilliamsHave you ever heard someone compare a wine’s aroma to “cat’s pee on a gooseberry bush” or a pile of grey flint? Wine buffs have a reputation for overblown adjectives and can seem to have a language of their own. Half the skill is in flaring one’s nostrils delicately over the glass in an attempt to demonstrate wining prowess; the other half is about having the imagination to catch a whiff of petrol or leather. Doesn’t sound appetising? The good news is that the smell of wine isn’t necessarily a reflection of whether you’re going to like it. We both agree that our favourite has a whiff of soggy trainers left to fester under the stairs for a couple of years. Very Jilly Goolden. What’s more, don’t feel obliged to drink the whole bottle just because its got an impressive tag on it…trust your taste buds. If they revolt when your father proudly presents his finest vintage, tucked away in the garage since he bought the house, then don’t feel you have to merrily drink the stuff as it ruins a good meal. Beginner or not, the first and most important thing you are taught is that despite the wealth of wine-related know-how, there is no substitute for being confident in your own senses. Rule number one: there are no rules. This should be a breeze then…Wine tasting, as Bacchus President Catherine Lee explains, is a ‘contact sport’: you have to learn by doing. At the meeting, armed with a brightly coloured and amusingly-labelled tasting wheel and some guidelines, we set to examining the wine’s appearance, nose and palate. Wine tasting isn’t about knocking back glasses of the stuff: it’s about analysing smell, taste, acidity, alcohol and tannin. Swirl the wine to release its smell, and do really smell it, as so much of a wine’s taste is wrought together with its nose. And remember, what one person may smell and taste can completely diverge from the next person’s opinion. We took encouragement from this when our views clashed horribly with those around us.Wine is also an academic subject: the beginners’ classes certainly open your eyes up to how much there is to learn about wine production and its cultural significance. The ‘Five Vs’ hint at the myriad variables that make one wine taste the way it does: vines, vineyard, vintner, viticulture and vitification. The beauty of Bacchus is that it enables you to keep building up from the foundations laid by the beginners’ course, so that the next time you’re tasting in a posh restaurant, you can use wonderful little phrases such as “this wine’s a little too young to be up so late” with aplomb. last_img read more

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Ez Lupianez steps up for Bengals

first_imgOffensive Player of the Week: Kyle Arano – ChargersDefensive Player of the Week: Kyle Arano – ChargersTeamwork/Leadership of the Week: David Matos – Eagles Dusting themselves off after a lopsided loss to the now (4-0) Chargers, the (0-3) Eagles set their sights on downing the (1-2) Bengals in a JCC of Bayonne Sr. Division Indoor Flag Football bout. Getting on the board first, the Eagles’ David Matos scampered 15 yards for a TD. Down 6-0, the Bengals battled out to a 24-6 advantage on long TD passes to Mike Piscopo, Drew Radil, and Chris Ballance followed by extra point grabs by Piscopo (2) and Chris Ballance (4). Taking flight with QB Chris Caballero at the helm and wide outs Mariam Rasslan, Jack Kruchkowski, and Matos racing up court, the Eagles cashed in as Matos reeled in a TD dart and a two point snare making it 24-14, Bengals. Staying with their air attack, the Eagles had no less than five TD strikes slip out of the waiting hands of their usually sure handed playmakers. With the Eagles faltering on offense, the Bengals pounced out to a 36-14 victory as Ezekiel Lupianez racked up two TD catches in the final five minutes.Week 3 Sr. Division:last_img read more

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Alan Clarke to leave Scottish Bakers

first_imgThe association has today announced that Alan Clarke, who has been chief executive for seven years, will leave Scottish Bakers in June.Clarke will leave the organisation at the end of June to take up the role of chief executive of Quality Meat Scotland.Craig McPhie, president of Scottish Bakers, said Clarke was leaving the association “in a much healthier position than when he joined”. During Clarke’s time as president, McPhie said Scottish Bakers “had built on the World Championship Scotch Pie Awards and established the Scottish Baker of the Year Awards, making a positive impact to each of the winning businesses.” He added that the association had also won Conference of the Year twice in a row, at the UK Association Awards.In conclusion, McPhie said: “I would like to thank Alan for everything he and his team have achieved and we sincerely wish him well for the future as we look to fill some very big shoes.”Scottish Bakers told British Baker that a recruitment process is underway.last_img read more

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Whitworth Bros scoops Tanker Operator of the Year award

first_imgEast Midlands flour miller Whitworth Bros has taken the top prize at this year’s Tip-Ex/Tank-Ex Show.The family-owned business won the Tanker Operator of the Year award at the event. Held in Harrogate this month, Tip-Ex/Tank-Exis a national show for the tipper, tanker and bulk haulage industries.Judges were looking for successful business strategy, a commitment to training tanker drivers, evidence of “innovative thinking” and a focus on health and safety.Whitworth Bros increased its road presence this year, adding 19 Feldbinder tipping tankers to its fleet.Additionally, the firm has used remote tanker tipping systems to keep operators away from potential harm, and dehumidifier units and a tanker top central lid locking system to improve food safety.The Tanker Operator of the Year category was sponsored by Feldbinder UK, which manufactures specialist vehicles used by the utility transport industry.last_img read more

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Keenan Revue set for Stepan

first_imgThe Keenan Revue will be held in the Stepan Center on Feb. 10 – 12, marking its return to Notre Dame’s campus from its previous venue, Saint Mary’s O’Laughlin Auditorium. “Last year, we found out through The Observer that we couldn’t use the venue anymore,” producer Chase Riddle, a junior, said. “They said it wasn’t keeping with their mission statement. We went on a wild goose chase to find something comparable [in size].” Riddle said they searched for a place starting immediately after last year’s Revue, looking at options on and off campus. They finalized the use of the Stepan Center this fall. “We wanted to bring it back to Notre Dame,” director Grayson Duren, a junior, said. Riddle said this year’s Revue is titled “Keenan Revue: Too Big For Saint Mary’s,” and ticket distribution begins today at 4 p.m. at the gate three of the Joyce Center. Each student can bring two student IDs and get two tickets per student ID, Burley said. There will be 1,300 tickets per show, with three showings. Keenan residents will also receive tickets. Riddle said the Revue has been growing less offensive. “What surprises me is we were going into past scripts, and they were vulgar,” he said. “In our two years [working with the Revue], it’s been much cleaner.” Duren said the jokes have become more clever. “We’ve been moving away from vulgarity because they’ve been censoring skits,” Nick Burley, Keenan Hall co-president and junior, said. “…The best thing you can do is find a balance between the two. Witty skits are just okay. Vulgar ones are hit or miss. Skits that strike the balance are the best.” Duren said the Revue has 26 to 28 segments, including two speeches, four songs performed by the band and 20 to 22 skits. Keenan residents create the skits and bring them to the Revue staff on tryout days, Duren said. After a few initial rounds, the remaining skits are brought before Keenan rector Fr. Dan Nolan. “If it’s someone’s idea, they’ll be in [the skit],” Burley said. “It’s neat. You usually see a skit all the way through the creative process to onstage.” The skits are put into a script, which is then censored by the rector, Riddle said. “[In 2009] there was one skit cut,” Riddle said. “No full skits were cut this year.” The musicians are all Keenan residents too. “There is a good array of music this year,” Riddle said. “Everyone is going to be happy about the two ‘exotic dancer’ songs.” The participants will be rehearsing through the week, Riddle said. Duren said the dancers take collections during the Revue for Keenan’s Hall Scholarship, which the rector distributes the funds to hall residents. Alumni donations fund approximately 80 percent of the Revue, which cannot be paid for completely by Student Activities Office funding, Riddle said.last_img read more

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Cynthia Nixon Talks Going from Daughter to Mother in The Real Thing

first_img View Comments The Real Thing star Cynthia Nixon has quite the history with the Tom Stoppard play. In 1984, she appeared in the original production as Debbie (while simultaneously starring in Hulyburly two blocks up). Now, she stars in the Roundabout revival as Charlotte (Debbie’s mother). The Tony, Emmy and Grammy winner stopped by The Today Show on November 5 and shared that she’s still “e-mail buddies” with Christine Baranski, who played Charlotte back in 1984. The Sex and the City actress also addressed rumors of a second sequel, saying she’d be “thrilled for the opportunity” if it worked out. But the most shocking news? Nixon does not have a television in her house. However, she does have two Emmy Awards. Hmm. Take a look at the interview below! Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015 The Real Thinglast_img read more

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New solar plants equipped with electricity-storage capacity are proliferating across the U.S.

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):The solar energy industry has achieved its long-time quest to become cost-competitive with conventional power across wide swaths of the United States. Now it is on to a new mission: saving that energy for later.Large-scale solar power plants coupled with energy storage systems are multiplying in the U.S., as developers and grid operators seek to smooth the variable output of solar plants by storing the electricity they produce for peak power demand in the evening. At least 51 such hybrid systems 1 MW and larger are online or planned, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data. Operational systems total 783 MW of solar capacity tied to 492 MW of storage for various periods of time, while planned projects account for 3,228 MW of solar integrated with 2,888 MW of storage.Many of these solar-plus-storage projects are concentrated in the Southwest. Hawaii and the Northeast also have multiple projects planned or underway. Beyond known projects with identifiable developers, many more solar-plus-storage power plants are earlier in the development process. Grid operator interconnection queues and recent responses to utility requests for proposals show several thousand megawatts of additional potential.In response to Xcel Energy Inc.’s recent request for proposals, for instance, developers pitched 57 projects in Colorado for more than 10,000 MW of battery-backed photovoltaics. The California ISO’s generator interconnection queue, as of May 24, showed 16 projects coupling 3,340 MW of solar PV with 2,532 MW of batteries. Another 14 solar-plus-storage projects with a combined maximum output of more than 5,000 MW were exploring interconnection in Arizona Public Service Co.’s territory, as of April 4. Additional large-scale battery-backed solar projects are under study in the ISO New England, New Mexico and PJM Interconnection.“I see a future with more battery and solar combinations,” Jeff Burke, director of resource planning at APS, said in an interview.On new energy frontier, solar-plus-storage plants proliferate New solar plants equipped with electricity-storage capacity are proliferating across the U.S.last_img read more

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Tioga County receives Community Health Assessment results

first_imgWhile the numbers are not extraordinarily different from previous assessments, current statistics are causing public health officials to take action. “That’s really where some of our concern lies. We are obviously concerned about adults in our county, but really looking at the children in our county, their health, and how we can lay a better foundation for them to have a healthier future,” said Tioga County Public Health Department Senior Public Health Educator Kylie Holochak. OWEGO (WBNG) — The Tioga County Public Health Department announced results for their Community Health Assessment. The survey is mandated by New York State, and is required to be given every five years. More than 800 Tioga County residents completed the survey. The findings show there has been an increase in obesity and substance use amongst children. Specifically, nearly 30 percent of residents report eating less than one fruit per day, and 25 percent consume at least one sugary drink daily. center_img In response to the updated numbers, the public health department has released their improvement plan, detailing issues to address, including children’s health. One of the areas the public health department focuses on is dental health, hosting services through their mobile dental unit, accessible for families and children. The improvement plan will also address women’s health, mental health, and substance use disorders. The assessment addresses multiple factors, including access to care, health outcomes, and physical environments.last_img read more

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British Land appoints top City banker as chief exec

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Kwik-Fit founder to sign 400,000 sq ft shed letting

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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