Personal profile

first_img Previous Article Next Article If you had three wishes to change your company what wouldthey be? To have the resources to meet the public expectations of ourservice, to guarantee the safety of our police officers and to be able toreward excellent performance. What motivates you to go to work?Making the difference – there’s never a dull momentwhen introducing change into organisations. What is your least appealing characteristic?My unwillingness to accept that some people in organisationsdon’t always see that my proposals are for the good of the company and that mysuggestions are made from the best of motives. Related posts:No related photos. CV 1998 to date head of corporate services, Isle of ManConstabulary1996 Director of human resources, North Wales Police1992 Human resources manager, Enron Power Operations 1989 Personnel development manager, Clayton Aniline 1987 Personnel manager – Scotland, KelcoInternational1985 Employee relations representative, Marathon Oil UK What is your greatest strength?Getting people motivated and into the spirit and ethics ofthings despite themselves or their organisational hang-ups. What is the best thing about working in HR?Being recognised as so critical to the success of anenterprise that human resources practitioners are an automatic choice for anyproject/management group.center_img What is the strangest situation you’ve had to deal withat work?Moving – after years of handling redundancy situations andexperiencing high unemployment –  to anisland where there is zero unemployment and whereability to work is regulated by work permit. Based on the Isle of Man, Roy Martin is head of corporateservices for the island’s Police Service and chairman of the local CIPD branch.He has previously held, in both the public and private sectors, a variety ofsenior appointments at director and managing board level. Personal profileOn 23 Jan 2001 in Personnel Today What the worst thing about working in HR?Being seen by unenlightened line managers as administratorsand providers of non-strategic support services. Comments are closed. What is the most important lesson you have learned inyour career?No matter how good it was, the past cannot be recaptured;there is no going back. Organisational management must look forward.last_img read more

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Shorter breaks lead to higher productivity levels

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Short breaks are taking over from traditional summer holidays and lead tohigher productivity at work, according to new research. A survey by Reed.co.uk shows that the UK’s attitude towards holidays ischanging and that UK staff are set to take 82,763,000 short breaks this year. Of more than 6,500 people surveyed, less then one in three (30 per cent)will be taking a traditional fortnight’s summer break, while 70 per cent saidthey were more likely to take a short break than they were five years ago. Two-thirds of UK staff feel that shorter breaks lead to higher productivitycompared with traditional two-week holidays. Workers also believe short breaks make the return to work less stressfulbecause they don’t have to face big backlogs of work on their return. “Short holidays mean that things can generally wait until you getback” said one respondent,. Another put it more bluntly when they said:”There is less work to catch up on and fewer mistakes to correct caused bythe people who attempted to cover for you.” Martin Warnes, head of operations for Reed.co.uk, said: “The UK appearsto be undergoing a shift in attitudes towards holidays, with rising numberstaking short breaks instead of the traditional summer fortnight. “While factors such as the increase of cheap flights and last-minutedeals play their part, it seems many people also find that short breaks cutdown workplace stress.” Comments are closed. Shorter breaks lead to higher productivity levelsOn 13 Jul 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Hoboken has a $8.5-10 million debt, and it’s a problem

first_imgMichael Lenz Dear Editor:Mayor Zimmer sent a Nixle on the $8.5-10 million Hoboken owes to Suez Water. Yet in over 1,000 words the word “debt” never appears. Google defines debt as “something, typically money, that is owed or due.” There has been some nervous muddying from City Hall about whether the money is currently due, but there have been no claims that it is not owed. While City Hall has kept it pretty quiet,Hoboken does, in fact, owe $8.5-10 million to Suez, and Mayor Zimmer has known about it for years.But I can understand why she didn’t say so. Admitting keeping an $8.5-10 million obligation secret raises uncomfortable questions: 1) How long did the Mayor know about this debt? The Nixle alert says 2 years, at the last council meeting they said 4 years, and the reality is anyone’s guess. 2) Who knew, and when? Did city auditor Steve Wilcotz know? At the council meeting he said he didn’t, but the Nixle raises questions when it says “accountants” did. Which accountants? Which Council members knew before July? I know Cunningham, DeFusco, Fisher, and Giattino have said they knew nothing, and I think Russo and Ramos said so too, but I’m not sure on the rest. Even Councilman Bhalla would be expected to answer – recusing yourself from a vote doesn’t mean you don’t have to answer to the public. And what about the Mayor’s former chief of staff, now manager of the Bhalla campaign? It’s kind of hard to believe the chief of staff didn’t know. 3) Was this debt disclosed in the annual audits, and in recent bond offering statements? My strong suspicion is no. Was it required to be? I think it extremely likely. If some credible professional said it was ok to leave it out – as Mayor Zimmer implies in her Nixle – who were they, did they put those opinions in writing at the time, and why haven’t we seen the proof? It’s no wonder Mayor Zimmer is publically second guessing herself for going public on this before the election.Does any of this matter? I think it does. If “reform” means anything it means talking openly and honestly about what’s going on in City Hall. Despite what has been implied, no $8.5-10 million forgiveness is coming, there is no Santa Claus, and even though you can refinance your mortgage – or your water bill – you still end up owing the money. Why does this matter? Because when our elected leaders start hiding financial realities they invariably end by doing deeply damaging things as they struggle to avoid disclosure. About 17 years ago a past administration put short term priorities over long term fiscal health and signed the awful water deal that haunts Hoboken now. Had the facts not come out it could easily have happened again. Slow down. Get the facts. We’ve owed the money for years, we’ll still owe it in January. Let the next Mayor and Council decide. They, and we, will have to live with those decisions.last_img read more

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Ocean City Skate Park Construction Underway

first_imgThe Comcast trailers at the site of the new skateboard park will be moved to Shelter Road. Work on Monday, May 18, to clear a spot for a new skateboard park between West Avenue and Asbury Avenue off Fifth Street.A milling machine removed a neat rectangle of pavement Monday on a city-owned parking lot at Fifth Street and Asbury Avenue to make way for construction of a new skateboard park.The project started on time, and the contractor anticipates finishing work in three months. The new $732,284 concrete facility will replace a park at Sixth Street and Boardwalk that was dismantled in 2011 due to safety concerns.__________Read more about the project and the park design.__________At the same time, trailers that served as a temporary Comcast cable TV company office were being removed. The Comcast trailers will reopen at a new location near the Ocean City Humane Society on Shelter Road, which is accessed by Tennessee Avenue (between 22nd and 23rd streets off Bay Avenue).__________All the O.C. headlines delivered to your inbox for free: Sign up for OCNJ Daily newsletter.__________last_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Shares Pro-Shot “Glory > Bridgeless” Encore From Detroit [Watch]

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee spent the weekend hosting the “Mitten Run,” a series of shows through the great state of Michigan. With one night in Grand Rapids and two more in Detroit, the band made themselves right at home with some fiery playing amid the cold weather. On February 3rd, the band descended upon The Fillmore Detroit, rocking the venue thoroughly for a great performance. The show culminated in a rocking two song encore, which included their classic tunes “Glory” and “Bridgeless.”Thanks to the band and to their webcast stream providers, TourGigs, we can watch a full length pro-shot video of that encore in the embedded player below. Enjoy!For extended coverage of this performance, including a gallery, setlist, full taper audio recording and more, head here.last_img

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A new vision for Houghton Library

first_imgAn upcoming renovation to Houghton Library will modernize its research and teaching facilities, expand its exhibition galleries, improve physical access to its spaces and holdings, and create a more welcoming, inviting, and accessible environment.The renovation represents a key component of a larger vision for the rare books library, which celebrated its 75th anniversary last year. It serves as a research center and teaching laboratory for students and faculty across many disciplines that use primary sources, hosting nearly 300 class visits each year and programming a series of exhibitions and events that draw a range of visitors from across Harvard and surrounding communities. To expand its reach vastly, the library’s digitization efforts have placed its collections within reach of researchers around the world.“We want all of Houghton Library — the collections, the building, and our expert staff — to generate interest in and passion for the humanities, the arts, the social sciences, and more,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “Our efforts to create a more inclusive atmosphere and to increase access to Houghton’s collections and services will ensure the library becomes an even more active and highly valued resource for Harvard and the world at large.”The renovations were made possible through generous donations, including a major gift from philanthropist and bibliophile Peter J. Solomon ’60, M.B.A. ’63, and his wife, Susan, whose extensive collection of rare and treasured children’s literature and illustrations provided the catalyst for the renovation. The Solomon collection includes a copy of the suppressed first edition of “Alice in Wonderland,” as well as additional works by Lewis Carroll, Beatrix Potter, Edward Lear, and other authors. The Solomons’ promised donation sparked an effort to make Houghton more welcoming to the Harvard community and visitors alike.,“Peter’s gift is a testament to his profound love of books, his belief in the power of literature to change lives, and the essential role of the library in the life of the University and in society at large,” said Sarah E. Thomas, vice president for the Harvard Library and University librarian and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. “There are so many people his generous support will affect: students, faculty, researchers, and visitors from around the world, and of course the staff who support the critical work of the library. I know our gratitude is deep.”“We wanted our collection to be where it would join similar holdings and be enjoyed by the widest possible audience,” Solomon said. “Houghton houses extraordinary material and enjoys a prime location within the Yard, but more Harvard students should explore its treasures.“Redesigning the entrance, integrating the building more prominently into its surroundings, and creating a more dynamic set of interior spaces will encourage greater appreciation of the library,” he added.Construction will begin next September, and the building will be closed until September 2020. During renovations, the Houghton Reading Room will return to its original location, the Periodicals Reading Room in Widener Library. Classrooms in Widener Library, Pusey Library, and Lamont Library will accommodate courses that use Houghton collections for teaching.Houghton is working with Ann Beha Architects and partnering with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Office of Physical Resources and Planning on the two-year project. The renovation will include redesigning the landscape between Quincy Street and the library entrance; replacing the daunting main entrance staircases with elegant paths at a wheelchair-accessible gradual incline; and connecting a plaza to the entrance, creating more space for people to gather outside. Natural light will be introduced to the entrance lobby, which will feature a dynamic exhibition gallery displaying materials drawn from the library’s collections. A new elevator will take visitors to the teaching spaces, exhibition gallery, and special thematic rooms on the second floor. Ground-floor restrooms will be remodeled and expanded. Improvements to Houghton’s reading room will include a soundproof entry and help-desk area, and an adjacent room where library users can work with materials in collaboration with library staff.The plans have the enthusiastic support of the University, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and the Harvard Library.“Today’s libraries are much more deeply engaged in teaching and outreach, and in an era where digital information is so prevalent, connecting people with our special collections and original materials which resonate with the context of their time and form is a key goal of Harvard Library,” said Thomas. “As a member of the Harvard College Library and Harvard Library, Houghton plays an important role in opening up the magic of collections and libraries to all visitors, as well as supporting research and teaching.”last_img read more

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Intel from an outpatient COVID-19 clinic

first_imgThis is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.Since the early days of the COVID-19 crisis, scientific literature and news reports have dedicated much attention to two groups of patients — those who develop critical disease and require intensive care and those who have silent or minimally symptomatic infections.Such accounts have mostly overlooked another large and important category of patients — those with symptoms concerning enough to seek care, yet not serious enough to need hospital treatment.Now, a new report by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Harvard-affiliated Cambridge Health Alliance offers insights into this in-between category based on data collected from people presenting at an outpatient COVID-19 clinic in Greater Boston.The team’s observations, published April 20 in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, are based on data from more than 1,000 patients who have sought care for respiratory illness since COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March.The findings offer a compilation of clues that can help clinicians distinguish between patients with COVID-19 infections and those with other conditions that may mimic COVID-19 symptoms.Such clues are critical because early triage and rapid decision-making remain essential even now that testing is becoming more widely available than it was in the early days of the pandemic, the research team said. Testing remains far from universal, and even when available, tests still may have a turnaround time of one to three days. Additionally, some rapid point-of-care tests that have emerged on the market have not been entirely reliable and have caused false-negative readings.“Early recognition and proper triage are especially important given that in the first days of infection, people infected with SARS-CoV-2 may experience symptoms indistinguishable from a variety of other acute viral and bacterial infections,” said study lead author Pieter Cohen, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a physician at Cambridge Health Alliance. “Even when point-of-care diagnostic tests are available, given the potential for false-negative results, understanding the early natural history of COVID-19 and good old-fashioned clinical skills will remain indispensable for proper care.” Related Organized to fight the pandemic To stem the coronavirus crisis, Harvard Medical School scientists forge ahead on six key fronts A nuanced understanding of the typical presentation of COVID-19 in the outpatient setting can also help clinicians determine how often to check back with patients, the researchers added. For example, those who have started developing shortness of breath demand very close monitoring and frequent follow-up to check how the shortness of breath is evolving and whether a patient may be deteriorating and may need to go to the hospital.According to the report, COVID-19 typically presents with symptoms suggestive of viral infection, often with low-grade fever, cough and fatigue, and, less commonly, with gastrointestinal trouble. Shortness of breath usually emerges a few days after initial symptoms, becomes most pronounced upon exertion and may involve sharp drops in blood oxygen levels.Chief among the team’s findingsFever is not a reliable indicator. If present, it could manifest only with mild elevations in temperature.COVID-19 may begin with various permutations of cough without fever, sore throat, diarrhea, abdominal pain, headache, body aches, back pain and fatigueIt can also present with severe body aches and exhaustion.A reliable early hint is loss of the sense of smell in the first days of disease onset.In serious COVID-19, shortness of breath is a critical differentiator from other common illnesses.Almost no one, however, develops shortness of breath, a cardinal sign of the illness, in the first day or two of disease onset.Shortness of breath can appear four or more days after onset of other symptoms.The first days after shortness of breath begins are a critical period that requires close and frequent monitoring of patients by telemedicine visits or in-person exams.The most critical variable to monitor is how the shortness of breath changes over time. Oxygen saturation levels can also be a valuable clue. Blood oxygen levels can drop precipitously with exertion, even in previously healthy people.A small number of people may never develop shortness of breath but may have other symptoms that could signal low oxygen levels, including dizziness or falling.Anxiet — common among worried patients with viral symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 — can also induce shortness of breath.Distinguishing between anxiety-induced shortness of breath and COVID-19-related shortness of breath is critical. There are several ways to tell the two apart.Key differentiatorsTime of onset: Anxiety-induced shortness of breath occurs rapidly, seemingly out of the blue, while COVID-19 shortness of breath tends to develop gradually over a few days.Patient description of sensation: Patients whose shortness of breath is caused by anxiety often describe the sensation occurring during rest or while trying to fall asleep but does not become more pronounced with daily activities. They often describe a sensation of inability to get enough air into their lungs. By contrast, shortness of breath induced by COVID-19-related drops in oxygen gets worse with physical exertion, including performing simple daily activities like walking, climbing stairs or cleaning.Anxiety-related shortness of breath does not cause drops in blood oxygen levelsDuring a clinical exam, a commonly used device, the pulse oximeter, can be valuable in distinguishing between the two. Clipped onto one’s finger, the device measures blood oxygen levels and heart rate in a matter of seconds.Several types of pneumonia — a general term denoting infection in the lungs — can present with striking similarity to COVID-19. For example, COVID-19 respiratory symptoms appear to closely mimic symptoms caused by a condition known as pneumocystis pneumonia, a pulmonary infection predominantly affecting the alveoli, the tiny air sacs lining the surface of the lungs. Both COVID-19 patients and patients with pneumocystis pneumonia experience precipitous drops in oxygen levels with exertion and shortness of breath. However, in the case of pneumocystis pneumonia, the shortness of breath typically develops insidiously over weeks, not within days, as is the case with COVID-19. Here, a careful patient history detailing evolution of symptoms would be critical, the authors said.Likewise, during the initial days of infection, both the flu and COVID-19 may have identical presentations, but thereafter the course of the two infections diverges. People with uncomplicated flu rarely develop significant shortness of breath. When they do experience trouble breathing, the shortness of breath is mild and remains stable. On the rare occasion of when flu causes a viral pneumonia, patients deteriorate rapidly, within the first two to three days. By contrast, patients with COVID-19 don’t begin to develop shortness of breath until several days after they first become ill.Study co-investigators include Lara Hall, Janice Johns and Alison Rapaport.Relevant disclosures: Cohen has received compensation from UpToDate, a company providing clinical decision-support tools. Researchers prepare for next year and beyond Designing a coronavirus vaccinelast_img read more

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Cheyenne Jackson to Bring Music of the Mad Men Era to L.A.

first_imgWhen you’re throwing a party, you’ve gotta invite Cheyenne Jackson! The Broadway star, along with Emmy winner Jane Lynch and Rebecca Romijn, will bring his Music of the Mad Men Era concert to L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall on April 26. Jackson and his special guests will sing lounge music from the ‘50s and ‘60s accompanied by members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The concert hall is celebrating its 10th anniversary season. Jackson has also performed his popular Music of the Mad Men Era concert at New York City’s Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln and Kennedy Centers in Washington, D.C. The concert is described as centering on “a time when bossa nova was new, the lounges of New York City were hip, and catchy dance music spun on every hi-fi.” Jackson, who jumped from Broadway’s Xanadu and Finian’s Rainbow to TV’s 30 Rock and Glee, will perform hits of the era such as “Feeling Good,” “Luck Be a Lady” and “Sway.” Jackson most recently appeared on Broadway as a porn star in The Performers, with other credits including Aida, Thoroughly Modern Millie and All Shook Up. His upcoming film credits include Six Dance Lessons In Six Weeks and Opening Night. On stage, he’ll appear with Laura Benanti in the Encores! revival of The Most Happy Fella in April. Cheyenne Jackson Laura Benanticenter_img Star Files View Comments Jane Lynchlast_img read more

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Los Zetas, a Cartel of Former Military Personnel, Suspected of Killing Migrants

first_imgBy Dialogo April 14, 2011 Just like the rose bush produces roses, the army produces these degenerate paramilitary groups and how weird is that the USA continues selling them arms and pretending like nothing is happening. In this game those with power win and the powerless people always lose! Los Zetas, whose tentacles extend from the southern United States to Central America, are a group created by Mexican military personnel who deserted to join the Gulf cartel, with which they are now in confrontation, and in order to finance this dispute, they resort to kidnapping migrants and to other crimes. Their territorial base is in northeastern Mexico, where they are believed to have kidnapped several buses and murdered at least 116 people whose bodies were found this month in San Fernando, a town in the state of Tamaulipas, according to statements by the attorney-general, Marisela Morales, on Tuesday. Heriberto Lazcano (alias ‘El Lazca’) is considered the organization’s highest-ranking leader by the Mexican government, which has put a price on his head of more than two million dollars. Los Zetas usually wear black and use military ranks (“commanders,” “veterans,” “falcons,” and “cobras”), and they use “high-powered weapons and cutting-edge technology that they deploy in order to organize ransom operations and large-scale attacks,” a Mexican government document indicates. The Gulf cartel continues to handle the majority of cocaine trafficking, while Los Zetas, according to Guadalupe Cabrera, a professor of government at the University of Texas at Brownsville, have begun to expand into other crimes as well, such as kidnapping, extortion from retailers, and stealing fuel. According to Raúl Benítez, a researcher on security issues at the Autonomous University of Mexico, “they kidnap migrants in order to ask their relatives in the United States for ransom, or in the case of the poorest ones, in order to use them as ‘mules’ (porters) to bring cocaine” into the United States. In August, Los Zetas were alleged to be responsible for the massacre at a rural property in San Fernando of seventy-two migrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Ecuador, and Brazil, who had been on their way to the United States. In February 2010, a Texas court found several firms guilty of buying gasoline stolen by Los Zetas in Mexico. In June, Nicaragua seized a weapons stockpile from alleged members of the gang near Managua, and in the same month, Venezuela announced the detention of Luis Tello, a Colombian, whom it identified as a liaison for Los Zetas. In December, the Guatemalan government declared a state of emergency along the Mexican border for several weeks, in order to combat Los Zetas camps, and detained eighteen people. The gang was initially made up of around forty members of the Mexican Army’s special forces, recruited by then-first lieutenant Arturo Guzmán (alias Z-1, for his military code) to provide security for Gulf cartel boss Osiel Cárdenas. Cárdenas was arrested in 2003, extradited to the United States in 2007, and sentenced last year to twenty-five years in prison. Since then, Los Zetas have entered into a fratricidal dispute over control of the Gulf cartel that according to Mexico’s National Security Council had left 1,600 dead as of December.last_img read more

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Managing today’s multi-generational workforce

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The pressure was on for Cindy Swigert.It was 2010, and Swigert’s new employer, a growing Midwestern credit union, was preparing for a full core system conversion. Compounding the situation, half of the credit union’s employees had recently transitioned to a new system in the wake of a major merger and would have to go through the process all over again.“Add to that the dynamics of the different generations [of staff] and it became a big scary monster,” recalls Swigert, now vice president of human resources at $331 million asset Day Air Credit Union in Kettering, Ohio.Swigert and her colleagues tackled this challenge by forming multigenerational, multifunctional project teams. Their success provides a primer on how credit unions can leverage generational strengths to better serve members, and retain motivated employees. continue reading »last_img read more

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